Trouble In Paradise?

Standard

Living in another country is definitely exciting.  From one day to the next, you never know what you might encounter.  We make our home in Mexico for eight or more months of the year and spend the summer in Wisconsin.  Each transition carries its own problems and interesting events.

We hit the ground running on September 29, two weeks earlier than our usual arrival in Mexico.  Last year we rented a new casa, smaller and on one floor.  We didn’t live in it at all, instead, moving our things at the last minute before boarding our flight back to Wisconsin.  Wrong decision.

Although we kept in contact with the new landlord through the summer and he assured us things were fine, they were not.  We returned to find water all over the floors and the dining room ceiling caved in from the heavy rains we get here in the summer.  We opened the bedroom door to mold and mildew all over the walls – definitely not a place to sleep!

Since we got in late the first day we eyed the damage and slept in our recliners in the living room (no water damage there).  We called the landlord on Sunday and he finally arrived on Monday.  Of course, we had wonderful friends who offered us a place to sleep, but we worried about our stuff at this point so opted to stay.

Unable to cook in the kitchen, we ate out.  We opened the bedroom up and set fans all over the house.  It seemed to only make matters worse, blowing cement dust and mold spores all over the place.  Everything was covered in the stuff.

Finally, on Monday the landlord came with a man he said was an engineer and they looked at the damage.  “No problem,” he said.  “I’ll have them start repairing tomorrow.”

“No problem?  What planet are they from?” I thought.  “This is definitely a problem.”  When we asked about the bedroom, the landlord said a little paint and plaster would fix everything.  Skeptical, we waited for the engineer to come the next day.

Two men showed up the next morning and began tearing down what was left of the dining room ceiling.  Hard to explain here, but since these houses are made of cement and brick, the ceiling supports are iron rods that form a grid.  They were rusted through.  Shaking his head the engineer told us “Very dangerous.  You need to stay away from here.  I will talk to the landlord and return.”  Famous last words.  We never saw him or the landlord again.

So began a trying week.  We tried calling the landlord, to no avail.  We began looking for another house.  With the help of a good friend we were successful, and although the house is not exactly in the location we desired, we have a lot more room (and three flights of stairs – ugh!).  But, it’s within our budget, so we jumped right on it.

There’s too much to tell in one sitting, so stay tuned for the move (my next post).  Inzared has been yelling at me the whole time.  She wanted me to stop what I was doing and write down her words.  I refused.  She hollered at me.  I ignored her.  So she disappeared.  I suppose I’ll have to make nice with her soon or she’ll leave me altogether and that would be a tragedy.  She still has a couple of books to dictate.  Oh, well.  I’m fixing a glass of lemonade.  We just got Internet and I want to catch up on all my emails.  Tomorrow is another day!

I’d love to hear your thoughts on this subject.  What do you think?  Leave a comment and we’ll talk about it.

Check out INZARED, Queen of the Elephant Riders here:

Amazon Link: http://tinyurl.com/7dfave4

Amazon Author Page:  Amazon Author Page:  www.amazon.com/author/lleander

Video Trailer:  http://youtu.be/lQHtsFQGAP0

Website:  www.lleander.com

FB Author Page:  http://facebook.com/lleanderbooks

Advertisements

8 responses »

  1. It’s always an adventure and not always the good kind. Getting people to fulfill their obligations take patience. I’ve found in Thailand when I have work done I get them started and then not watch how they do it. It’s scary, but it does work. I’ve learned to do the electical work myself. Our house is cinderblock and bricks so at least it won’t burn down, lol.

    • Dannie, you probably can totally relate to this post. Things are just different here and we Americans have to get used to it. I’ve learned to be very patient, but this is honestly the first time in 8 years of living here that I have had any problems of this sort. So I guess it was time. We thought moving to the new house would save us money – we were wrong!

    • Thanks Angela! Can’t wait to see you. I remember you telling me about some issues – hopefully they’ll resolve. Ours didn’t but things are turning out just fine!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s