The Other Half

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L. LEANDER BOOKS:

There is a fascinating post on Writing Wranglers and Warriors today written by Author Doris McCraw. Ms. McCraw is a history buff and brings that passion to her writing about early women (and men) who helped shape the west. You owe it to yourself to read this post and follow the links. I think you’ll be glad you did!

Originally posted on Writing Wranglers and Warriors:

Post written and copyright by Doris McCraw

Doris

This past weekend I spent time with some amazing women who write about the experience of women in the West. The organization was celebrating its twentieth conference.  It began when women authors wished to be acknowledged as writers of western fiction. The group grew and we are the recipients of their vision.

Some have called me a feminist. While not offended, I consider myself a historian who wants to have a more complete picture of what really took place as we grew as a nation. The energy I received from being around others who also tell the story, both as fiction and non-fiction spurs me forward in that quest.

Mule drawn supply wagon

This in no way is discounting what history has told us about Kit Carson, Red Cloud, Custer and any of the other figures in our history. This is about telling…

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E-whelm

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L. LEANDER BOOKS:

Have you heard the term “Blogwhelm?” If not, you owe it to yourself to read this post by Author Kathy Waller on today’s Writing Wranglers and Warriors. I’m absolutely sure you’ll identify with at least some of the problems she mentions.

Originally posted on Writing Wranglers and Warriors:

0kathy-blog

Posted by Kathy Waller

I’ve come down with a serious case of Blogwhelm.

The term Blogwhelm was coined several years ago by my writer/songwriter/all-around artist friend Nita Lou Bryant. It describes the brain fog that develops when one realizes there are so many blogs on his favorites list that he can’t possibly read them all, and that there are more blogs out there just waiting to be discovered. It’s one of the best words I’ve come across in years. I’m waiting for it to go viral, after which it can take its rightful place in the OED.

When Blogwhelm hits me, I become paralyzed. I stare at the emails in my inbox announcing new posts. My index finger loses power. It doesn’t possess the strength to click. If I manage to access a post, perfectionism descends. I begin writing a comment but cannot find the…

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To the Rescue: Part 2 – How to Help Pets in Need

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L. LEANDER BOOKS:

This post is from Writing Wranglers and Warriors and is about something we should all be aware of. Author Gayle Irwin gives us facts about pet rescue/spaying and neutering/and pet adoption. This post is something we should all aware of.

Originally posted on Writing Wranglers and Warriors:

Gayle & Mary outsideThis post by Gayle M. Irwin

As far back as the mid-1800s, people in the United States rallied to the plight of animals. In 1866, Henry Bergh founded the ASPCA (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals), the first North American-based humane society. Nearly 150 years later, the ASPCA remains a fighting force for helping animal victims of cruelty and assisting pets and pet parents through adoptions and animal shelter assistance.

The ASPCA estimates there are nearly 14,000 animal shelters in America, and there are innumerable pet rescue organizations as well. From Rez Dawg Rescue, which focuses on helping homeless dogs on Native American reservations, to Kitty Keepers, a cat rescue organization based in Havre, Montana, from large sanctuaries like Best Friends in Utah to smaller, all-volunteer-based rescues like Western Border Collie Rescue, these organizations help the mutts and the breeds as well as provide…

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The Ghost Lady Who Didn’t Know She’d Died

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Since October is Halloween month I thought I’d share a scary story with my readers. Be sure to read this ghostly tale by author Mike Staton. It’ll leave you with shivers. Only on today’s Writing Wranglers and Warriors.

Originally posted on Writing Wranglers and Warriors:

This post written by this mustached guy, Mike Staton.

This post written by this mustached guy, Mike Staton.

I had a dilemma. Should I write a Writing Wranglers and Warriors post detailing the history of Halloween or undertake a risky move and write a scary story to mark trick-or-treat time? Well, I solved the dilemma. Here’s The Ghost Lady Who Didn’t Know She’d Died. Hope you enjoy my tale.

# # #

The antique table’s oil lamp provided enough light to draw attention to the wrinkles on Old Man Tucker’s craggy face. Eighty years of hard work produced those age lines – cutting and hewing trees and sawing and hammering until Tucker had fashioned himself a cabin in Southern Ohio’s Dungannon Valley. He’d made the cabin’s furniture himself, including the kitchen table and the chairs the two of us now sat in. In one corner a wood-burning stove expelled heat that drove back the October chill. A pot…

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To the Rescue! Part 1

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This is an important post about Adopt a Shelter Dog Month, written by Author Gayle Irwin. You won’t believe some of the information included and how the author helps in her own way.

Originally posted on Writing Wranglers and Warriors:

Gayle & Mary outsideThis post by Gayle M. Irwin

On Sunday I helped rescue: I transported a dog for English Springer Spaniel Rescue of America (Rocky Mountain chapter – there are chapters across the country) to his new, although temporary home. I have served as a transporter for various dog rescue organizations for nearly six years, primarily helping Springer Rescue and Big Dogs Huge Paws (based in Colorado), but I have also transported for Black Dog Animal Rescue (based in Cheyenne, Wyo.) and I’m on the contact list for at least two other groups. I find great satisfaction in helping dogs go from neglect or other difficult situations into new homes, whether those are caring foster homes (temporary) or their loving, permanent homes.

I transported Pepsi, a springer/beagle mix, on Sunday; he had lived with the same family for more than seven years but was kept outside most of his life and the…

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Fear of Falling, Part 2

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L. LEANDER BOOKS:

Here is Part 2 of Fear of Falling, a painful look into the past 2 years of my life. Thanks for reading!

Originally posted on Writing Wranglers and Warriors:

propic11_1_1This post written by L.Leander, Writer of Fearless Fiction

You may wish to read Fear of Falling Part 1 before you read this because it is a continuation of that post.

We had planned a trip with friends to a town south of Guadalajara, MX and had already paid for bus tickets, etc. There was no way I wasn’t going, even after the concussion and my Doctor’s orders to take it easy. This was three weeks later. The bruising was faded and I’d have Ralph to help so I wasn’t too worried. Everything went well until the first night and I had some sort of seizure. My whole body stiffened and I shook uncontrollably. This happened a couple of times during the night but with God’s help and Ralph holding me close, I got through it. We had a nurse in our party and I checked

spasguywith her the next…

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Remembering a murder and a man with multiple personalities

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I’m reblogging this post from Writing Wranglers and Warriors. It is written by Author Mike Staton, former news reporter. The incidents he encountered and wrote about in his newspaper days were interesting. Give this a read and see if you don’t agree!

Originally posted on Writing Wranglers and Warriors:

head shotThis post by Mike Staton.

She sat in the chair at the last table in the detective bureau. Her hands shook as she raised a hamburger to her mouth. No, that’s not exactly accurate. Her whole body shook, as if she’d been on the cusp of a seizure. Except she wasn’t having one. She was in the custody of the Lancaster Police Department for shooting and killing her boyfriend.

It’s been 35 years since I walked into the bureau and saw that terrified girl, alone in the back of the room, trying to eat a bland hamburger. I don’t remember her name. I don’t even remember her hair color or the exact clothes she wore. But I do recall she was pretty with long hair and long legs; it must have been the summertime… she wore tight jeans and a revealing top, but I can’t tell you the type of…

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Hummingbirds

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I love hummingbirds!

Originally posted on Writing Wranglers and Warriors:

Kathy - greenKate Wyland

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hummer flyingIn Native American lore hummingbirds are the symbol for joy and the good things in life. However, for me, they seem to be a symbol of change. I never was particularly aware of them while I was busy raising kids and working. They didn’t become part of my life until I semi-retired and we moved to a small acreage horse property – a big change for us. To go from the house down to the barn, we had to walk through some large Grevelia bushes covered with small red flowers. And every time we passed through, the hummingbirds would buzz and zip by us, upset about being disturbed. One of the fun things about our new house that I wish I paid more attention to. A few years later we re-landscaped, the bushes were torn out and we never saw our humming friends any more.

When we…

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The Sheepherder

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Very interesting post from Writing Wranglers and Warriors by Author Neva Bodin. Know how to herd sheep? You will after reading this!

Originally posted on Writing Wranglers and Warriors:

105182105411181CDPby Neva Bodin

“No speak Englese,” he said.

The man, probably in his thirties, stepped out of the sheep wagon sporting a wide, gap-toothed smile, a five o’clock shadow, and a tan not entirely due to the elements. He was flanked by three small border collies.

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The “No Speak Englese” sheepherder’s wagon.

That effectively ended my, “Hi, so you’re the guy we’ve seen riding by us on your four-wheeler and horse looking for sheep!” We commenced to petting the dogs who seemed more inclined to come forward with a welcome and “get to know me” attitude.

We recently camped back in the pines and aspen near a main artery to the popular Louis Lake in Wyoming. Several times a man on a four-wheeler, driving sensibly slow in comparison to the many other vehicles on the road carrying weekend vacationers through the incredibly gorgeous scenery, passed by. He came on a…

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What sparks your author imagination?

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L. LEANDER BOOKS:

There’s a real treat on today’s Writing Wranglers and Warriors. Author Nancy Jardine has written a post not only about what sparks your imagination as an author, but also beautifully describes Crannog Villages in her home country of Scotland. If you haven’t heard of these or Nancy’s books which contain many of these historical facts, you’re in for a new learning experience.

Originally posted on Writing Wranglers and Warriors:

For CCThis post is by Nancy Jardine

What sparks your author imagination?

Earlier this week, I made a return trip to a highly specialised museum /visitor centre named The Scottish Crannog Centre. This attraction is located at Kenmore, Loch Tay, Perthshire, Scotland. Opened in 1997 to the public, this incredible facility contains a reconstruction of a particular kind of late Iron Age dwelling – a crannog. Crannog evidence has been found in Scotland and Ireland almost exclusively, with only one or two known examples in England.

Dscn5636After various archaeological diving expeditions in Loch Tay, over a period of 20 years (approx 1980-2000) the area was recorded as a site of multiple crannog dwellings. It’s believed that the art of crannog building occurred over a very long period of time, from pre-historic times through to perhaps the 16th or 17th centuries, in some form or another, on the artificial…

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