Actor/Writer- How They Relate, Plus A New Release

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L. LEANDER BOOKS:

Do you have insecurities about your writing? Author Doris McCraw has written an insightful post on Writing Wranglers and Warriors today that discusses this problem. Be sure to read it – Doris has a new book coming out!

Originally posted on Writing Wranglers and Warriors:

Post written and copyright by Doris McCraw

Doris

As most readers of this post know I have researched the women doctors in Colorado prior to 1900 for some time now. During that time, I have also been pursuing other avenues of creativity. Since the release of my most recent work of fiction “Home for His Heart” is due on July 17,  I thought I would let you all know what’s been going on and why I felt the need to add another piece of pie to my plate.

Everything I attempt is really related. Although I had a mystery short story published about twelve years ago, I had not attempted historical romance. I spend a lot of time researching the past, so it seemed like a logical progression. But having written the piece and gone through the edits, the nervousness has set in.  Will readers like it? Did I tell the…

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Survivors and Fellow Citizens

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L. LEANDER BOOKS:

Author Neva Bodin has written a powerful post on Writing Wranglers and Warriors about the relocation of Japanese-American citizens and how they were wrongfully treated by the very country they had made their home.

Originally posted on Writing Wranglers and Warriors:

105182105411181CDPby Neva Bodin

Termed relocation, some who were relocated felt it was prison, others went along with the plan, not wanting to appear traitors to their newly adopted country, and even serving in the military. The year was 1942, about six months after the bombing of Pearl Harbor by the Japanese. All Japanese in America were suspect.

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Heart Mountain Courtesy of Wikipedia

Recently my husband and I toured the Heart Mountain Japanese Internment camp near Cody, Wyoming. What a lesson in human resilience. And prejudice. And attitude.

Families from California and Oregon “Assembly Centers”—where Japanese were collected into groups after being forced to leave their businesses and homes by Executive Order 9066—began arriving at hastily constructed barracks in August of 1942, near the Heart Mountain. It was a rather remote place, but near a railroad spur so people and supplies could be shipped there quite easily. Over 10,000 of the relocated…

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Promote Your Book in 10 Steps by Cher’ley

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L. LEANDER BOOKS:

If you need ideas with promotion of your latest (and future) book, check out this blog post on Writing Wranglers and Writers by Cherley Grogg. It’s one you’ll want to keep for reference!

Originally posted on Writing Wranglers and Warriors:

This Blog by Cher’ley Grogg

Books do not sell themselves. We have to get out there and get our names known and sell those books. Some of these you already practice and some of them are perhaps new to you.

The Internet has made us much more involved in our own marketing.

  1. Websites and Blogs
  2. Join a Blog Group
  3. Promote Your Site
  4. Market your book-in person
  5. Book Reviews Help
  6. Have a Book tour
  7. Use Social Media
  8. Focus on Twitter
  9. Guest Blogging
  10. Create a Book Trailer

1. Create A Website

website ideas

The first thing you’ll need in promoting your book is a website, preferably one that includes a blog. There are a lot free ones, and they are drag and drop, which means easy set-up. I use Web (previously Free Web) and WIX. I’m sure there are other free ones. My Website.  I am listing some of my links in case any of…

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Just Tell Me, I Won’t Repeat It!

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L. LEANDER BOOKS:

This post from Neva Bodin on Writing Wranglers and Warriors has some critical information about some of the apps and social media being used today.

Originally posted on Writing Wranglers and Warriors:

105182105411181CDP“Whispers, secrets and lies?” read the article headline. The sub-title was “Anonymity apps rise in popularity” by the Associated Press. The original article is at website: http://bigstory.ap.org/article/whispers-secrets-and-lies-anonymity-apps-rise.

Anonymity is defined by Merriam-Webster as the state of anonymous—unnamed, unknown.

First we joined Facebook to get our pictures, intimate news flashes, sometimes improper language (in my opinion anyway) out to the world, and to “friend” as many people as possible.

laundry jpegNow we need apps to help us remain anonymous while we, in old-fashioned words, “hang out our dirty laundry”! The article says, “With the app, friends and friends of friends can share their deepest and darkest thoughts, along with gossip, criticism and even plans to propose marriage, under a cloak of near-anonymity.” Now I wonder how many people when purchasing that app will catch the word, “near-anonymity.”

Inquiring minds want to know, right? Who will let someone who has just shared a…

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When is a song a story?

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L. LEANDER BOOKS:

I hope you’ll enjoy this post I wrote for Writing Wranglers and Warriors today. It’s about songwriting and what it means to me.

Originally posted on Writing Wranglers and Warriors:

propic11_1_1

This post by L.Leander, Author of Fearless Fiction

If you listen to as many songs as I do you’ve probably listened to the stories they tell.  The trick is to tell a story in 3 1/2 minutes or less, although established artists can get away with much longer songs.  Some songs don’t tell a story but contain a line that gives a message.  For instance “Don’t Worry, Be Happy” makes you light up when you hear it but doesn’t tell a story like a book.

I’ve written and copywritten at least five hundred or more songs.  Some I didn’t like but figured I could come back later and work on, and some I’m proud of.  Today I’m sharing with you a song I wrote in Mexico.  I made several trips to Tucson by bus or car so am familiar with the city.  When the words came to mind I set this story song…

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How’s the Weather?

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L. LEANDER BOOKS:

I’m the blogger on today’s Writing Wranglers and Warriors. We’ve had some crazy weather and that’s what I wrote about. Thanks for reading and please leave a comment!

Originally posted on Writing Wranglers and Warriors:

propic11_1_1This post by L.Leander, Author of Fearless Fiction

Weather plays a big part in our lives no matter where we live. Earthquakes in the west, tornadoes across the Midwest, hurricanes up and down both coasts and the Gulf of Mexico, floods and blizzards can be life-changing. Weather should play an important part in your writing. Is the day dark and gloomy? Is it sunny and bright? Is it raining in sheets? Is there blinding snow? Mud?  Are readers able to get a sense of how the weather impacts the story?

I remember reading one of Catherine Cookson’s first books. She wrote about the misty moors. Now, I’ve never seen a moor but I could almost see and feel it by her writing. This is something we all need to be aware of as we write our bestsellers.

Let me share with you something that happened this weekend. My great-nephew gradgraduated from…

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Gifts – Not Just Pretty Packages

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L. LEANDER BOOKS:

Do you understand gifts? Read this lovely post by fellow author Gayle Irwin. She knows!

Originally posted on Writing Wranglers and Warriors:

Gayle_BozemanFamilyChristian_smallThis post by Gayle M. Irwin

Gift – the word conjures up images of brightly wrapped boxes under a pine tree in December – or small, white boxes adorned with a colorful bow and containing a beautiful gemstone.

christmas tree with packagesBut, gifts don’t always come in pretty packages or contain expensive jewelry. In fact, if you’re Fred Flintstone, a gift is a bowling ball or vacuum cleaner! Seriously, though, gifts are people, even things, that brighten our lives. Gifts are treasures, large or small, that sparkle in our hearts, within our eyes, and on our faces.

Friendship is a gift. Whether down the street or across the country, those people in our lives whom we call friends bring us joy, encourage us, and uplift us.

Parents and GayleLove is a gift. Spouses, parents, grandparents, children, grandchildren … all are a source of love, and they, too, bring us joy, give us encouragement, and uplift…

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To Live History

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L. LEANDER BOOKS:

Love this post by Doris McCraw and thought you would too.

Originally posted on Writing Wranglers and Warriors:

This post written and copyrighted by Doris McCraw

Doris

What is it like to live history? There are numerous ‘towns’ and ‘ranches’ that allow visitors to watch living history. Some of the more famous are Colonial Williamsburg and Plimoth Plantation. In Colorado there is  Rock Ledge Ranch. There are those who recreate historic battles from the Revolutionary War on.

then there are people who take on historic character. I know Ben Franklin (Christopher Lowell), Theodore Roosevelt (Don Moon) and Franklin D. Roosevelt (Richard Marrold). Of course there are those who are unique to Colorado history.  Pearl DeVere, the Cripple Creek madam who died of an overdose of laudanum, Poker Alice, a poker player  in the Old West, Wm. J. Palmer founder of Colorado Springs and his wife Queen and James Burns, the Cripple Creek magnate who was one of the owners of the famous Portland Mine on Battle Mountain near the…

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Unsung Heroes

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Originally posted on Writing Wranglers and Warriors:

propic11_1_1This post by L.Leander, Author of Fearless Fiction Lloyd Schuyler, Rupert Adams, Hudson Doxtator, Rimton Doxtator.  Do these names mean anything to you? They should. They were proud men, members of the Oneida Tribe of Native Americans whose tribal lands are situated in and around Green Bay, WI, a town that is more notable for it’s NFL Green Bay Packers than these men of bravery who posthumously received the Gold Congressional Medal of Honor in a ceremony held on the Oneida Reservation May 23, 2014. It’s been a long time coming for these specialists who served bravely in WWII. Their unit? US Marine Code Talkers.

Although it is the Navajo tribe that is most known for being Code Talkers, there were many tribes involved who received no recognition until lately, after many were deceased. The reason? They gave an oath never to reveal their part in the war, thus receiving…

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Small Things Make a Difference by Cher’ley

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L. LEANDER BOOKS:

Friend and Author Cherley Grogg has written a beautiful post on today’s Writing Wranglers and Warriors about “The Little Things In Life.” You’ll love it, I promise.

Originally posted on Writing Wranglers and Warriors:

This Blog  by Cher’ley Grogg

An eyelash, a blade of grass, Tinkerbelle, Jack, and an embryo all have something in common they are small, but important. I lived in Texas for quite a while and in Texas the bigger the better. Everything is bigger in Texas, or so I’ve heard. I have come to realize that some of the most fascinating things on this earth are small.

I haven’t seen the movie Jack the Giant Killer on the big screen, but I read the book to my children when they were little, and I’m sure it was read to me when I was a tiny young’un. Jack, the small lad, climbs the beanstalk, kills the giant and gets the goose that lays the golden egg, and he and his mother live happily ever after. From the advertisements, I don’t believe that’s exactly what happens in the movie. But in the…

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